Brazos Gardeners Blog – Introduction
Published: Sunday, 01 September 2013 14:46
Written by Donna Murray, Brazos County Master Gardener

In keeping up with current venues for communicating, we are getting in the swing of things with a Brazos County Master Gardener blog.  I’m told that this is to be a Master Gardeners perspective of a love of gardening, providing a look at what’s happening in our gardens, research based information on techniques and plants, and photos to boot.

That’s a lot to deliver.  My hope is that the blog posts will be slips-cutting of a plant used to grow new plant-of information or images that encourage you to use the resources available through the Master Gardener program to garden successfully, responsibly, and enjoyably.

Many transplanted gardeners have variations of “Where I gardened before I could just throw it out the window and it grew”.  When moving to Brazos County I assumed that an academic background in horticulture and personal gardening experience, both acquired in NE Texas would transplant here as easily as the shortleaf pine seedlings brought with me.  The assumption and the pines died.  Becoming a Master Gardener reemphasized basic horticulture practices I had learned like the importance of soil preparation and matching plants to the site.

Craving the familiar scent and sight of pines, I took the recommendation of Dr. Doug Welsh, author, and retired professor and statewide coordinator for the Texas Master Gardener program, to plant Italian Stone Pine, Pinus pinea, tada-success.  When I pay attention to good cultural practices, and use native or locally adaptive plant species, I get to say, “I just threw it out the window and it grew”.

coreopsis, daylily, trailing-lantana

coreopsis, daylily, trailing-lantana

Italian Stone Pine

Italian Stone Pine